1. Maintain Your Focus

When driving a car, you should never try to “multitask.” All of your attention should be on driving all of the time. Don’t use your cellphone or any other kind of personal electronic device. Also, consider slowing down, so you have more time to react to surprising conditions you encounter.

2. Be a Defensive Driver

When we’re running late or frustrated by slow traffic, we often become more aggressive drivers, trying to wiggle our way through smaller spaces — even tailgating in some cases. Instead of doing this, we need to be more cautious. Rather than focusing your attention on how to get from one place or another as fast as possible, focus your attention on how to get there as safely as possible. You can drive defensively by:

  • Watching all other drivers carefully and expecting the unexpected.
  • Keeping two seconds of space between you and other vehicles and extending this to four seconds in poor weather conditions.
  • Yielding to other vehicles whenever possible. You’re not playing “chicken,” and you’re certainly not in a race.

3. Be as Safe as Possible

There are certain things you might do while driving that are riskier than you realize. Eating, adjusting the radio, talking with friends, and trying to use your cellphone while driving is all examples of this. When it comes to your cellphone, simply put this out of reach and never be tempted to use it. As for eating, pull off to the side of the road. And most importantly, always use your seatbelt and never drive after ingesting intoxicating substances or alcohol.

There’s a Limit to How Safe We Can Be While Driving

There’s only so much we can do to stay safe from an automobile collision. At the end of the day, we’re dependent upon the actions of other drivers too. If you were hurt by another driver as a result of negligent driving, unlawful behavior, or recklessness, investigate your legal rights and options.